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Cool Backyard Shower – outdoor shower ideas by d’un jardin a l’autre

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French company d’un jardin a l’autre has some cool outdoor shower ideas, like thisunusual backyard shower. The Bridge backyard shower won’t detract from your lush lawn and lovely landscaping. A simple U-shaped frame encircles you with three showerheads – one overhead and one on each side – for a refreshing, rejuvenating full-body spray. The temperature regulator ensures a comfortable temperature regardless of the weather. Regardless how much sun your backyard gets, you can set up this cool shower in the sun or in the shade – the durable, galvanized-steel frame endures all weather. Check out this modern outdoor shower idea at d’un jardin a l’autre.

 
 

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SPRING IS HERE – THE BIRDS ARE CHIRPING – This backyard bird feeder is the perfect project for you and your kids this Spring. The kids will love to see the birds enjoy their creation and you can enjoy the sounds.

  1.  Start by drawing a 1/2-inch asterisk on the side of a clean 1-liter soda bottle, about 4 inches from the bottom. Rotate the bottle 90 degrees and draw another asterisk2 inches from the bottom. Draw a 1-inch-wide circle opposite each asterisk, as shown.
  2. Use a craft knife to slit the asterisk lines and cut out the circles (a parent’s job). Insert a wooden spoon handle first through each hole and then through the opposite asterisk, as shown.
  3. Remove the bottle cap and twist a small eye screw into the top of it for hanging.
  4. Finally, fill your feeder with birdseed, recap it, and use a length of twine to hang it from a tree.

060811-hammock1.jpgFor the last several months I’ve had the image above saved on my computer. When I first came across it, I had one of those, “I want to go to there” moments and it’s been lingering around my thoughts ever since. There’s 5 main reasons why I love it so, can you guess what they are?

1. The Giant Sweet Swing of Goodness: So straight up, there’s no denying it, that swing is dope. Although it’s curvy lines might appear intimidating for homeowners to make themselves, wood can be manipulated slowly when kept wet (Google it!). Likewise, a flat platform, although not so cradle-like, would be an excellent stand-in and is easily conceived.

2. There’s Lighting: So no one is really looking at anything other than the cool swing thing, but the posts of this set up are actually lit and would give a nice romantic glow at night. What? You say they’ll attract bugs? I’m sure there’s a bulb made to deter them, no worries!

3. The Plants Below: I’m a big fan of yards that take care of themselves and the plants below this set up create just that. There’s no weed eating to be done with a string trimmer and it makes the space feel even more set apart from the rest of the world than it already is.

4. Pillows: Even if you think pillows have no place in the outdoor world (which I totally get living in the Midwest with constant weather changes), These bad boys make the space feel soft even though the surface of the swing is hard, unlike softer rope hammocks you might be used to.

5. Everything Within Reach: So there’s the swing, sure, but there’s also a little pond and a table for drinks and snacks near by. Often times hanging out in a hammock and catching up on your reading is great, but what happens if you get hungry? Going inside is just too far (I only slightly jest), so having a spot to keep things handy or being able to dip your toes in the pool is nice. If you’re recreating the look at home, try a nearby cooler or small table to keep things in reach.

I didn’t really need 5 reasons to justify this space being awesome, after all, there aren’t many who are even still reading this since you have already started day dreaming about lounging about in such a magical space. That said, when you pay attention to the comfort that small details provide, it’s amazing how much more inviting a space can be!

How To: DIY Tee Pee Tent – part 1

 

My sister asked me to help her make a Tee Pee for my niece Eva. It was fun to make and took us a couple of leisurely afternoons. This Tee Pee is a fun weekend project that can be used either indoors on a rainy day, or in the back yard when the sun is out. We’ve made it with an old bed sheet to save money on fabric.
This is a very detailed tutorial so this project will stretch over two posts.

Part 1 covers the making of the frame
Part 2 explains how to make the outer covering.

So lets get started-

For Part 1 you will need:
5x 18mm diam wooden dowels 180cm long (about 71″) (hardware store can usually cut these to size for you)
power drill
5mm drill bit
5mm thick cotton rope bundle, min length 1m (about 1 yard)
measuring tape
pencil
sticky tape
sandpaper (optional)

For Part 2 you will need:
1x queen size bed sheet
Sewing machine and general sewing supplies
3m bias tape for trims and ties
measuring tape (in inches)
fabric marker

How to:
Gather your supplies and clear a suitable work area for using your power drill. If you aren’t confident with power tools, ask a friend or family member to help.
To mark the hole positions, measure 26cm (10.25″) down from the top of the dowels and mark with an X.
Carefully drill one hole in each dowel.

Thread the rope through all the holes, it’s easier if you wrap some sticky tape around the end.
Pull a good length through to leave a couple of long ends. Tie a knot firmly then wrap the rope around a few times and knot firmly again.

Frame is done, now we are half way there.  Tune in next week for detailed instructions and measurements to make the outer cover.
 
So here is Part 2 – Making the outer covering of the Tee Pee


For Part 2 you will need:
1x queen size bed sheet (flat) – Choose one that has plenty of life in it, you don’t want a super worn out one that will tear after a few uses.
Sewing machine and general sewing supplies
3m bias tape for trims and ties
measuring tape (with inches)
soluble fabric markeror tailors chalk
long ruler or piece of dowel

I have drawn and included measurements for the panels. Please note all measurements are in inches (sorry Aussies).  And remember – MEASURE TWICE, CUT ONCE
The following measurements were calculated once the frame was made, so if you change the length of the poles, the fabric panels may need adjusting.

 
How to:  Study the cutting layout to become familiar with the best way to draft your pattern. Directional prints will need extra fabric as all the panels will have to fall in the same direction.


a) Using a tape measure and ruler mark out the first panel. Mark out the measurements without seam allowance then add seam allowances (to the outside). Start close to the edge of the sheet to ensure all panels will fit.
b) Cut out your first panel then use it as a template for subsequent panels using the cutting layout as a guide. For the door panel, cut a slit for the door.
c) Here is our cute assistant. She was fascinated by the measuring tape.

d) Add bias tape/binding around the door opening, I added a cute button to the top of the door opening where the binding overlapped.
e) Make 6 x 12″ bias tape tie cords by sewing your bias in half. Pin and sew 4 ties to the door panel about 12″ apart so they are equally spaced from the top and the bottom. Reserve the 2 remaining ties for later.

f) With WRONG sides of fabric together, sew together the long edges of the 5 panels. The seams should be on the outside of the cover at this stage (as pictured). Don’t worry you haven’t made a mistake.

g) Now we will hem the top opening edge. Roll a small edge over twice so there are no raw edges exposed towards what will be the inside of the tent and sew hem 1/2″ seam.
h) This part is crucial! Now we are making the tubes that the poles will feed through to keep everything together. Pay attention.
Now we want to sew a seam down the long sides of each long panel with the RIGHT sides of the fabric facing each other. The seam width should be about 1″ but depending on your dowel or your first seam you may have to make it just slightly wider or narrower. Try testing if the dowel fits snugly though one tube before you sew the rest. I had to make mine a little wider so some unpicking was involved. 
The photo (h) shows you what the top of the cover should look like inside out.

i) *** this photo is slightly deceptive as we accidentally missed photographing one step.*** Before feeding your frame through the cover, the bottom seam needs finishing. Hem as in (g) with a slightly wider seam allowance closing up the end of the tubes in the process. Poles should not stick out the bottom (see image j)
Feed frame in to guide tubes through top opening. Two people may be required as some man handling is called for.
j) Tie backs. Here we are using the two remaining ties that we reserved earlier. Pin them in your desired position. These tie onto the bottom door ties to hold the door open. Sew into position. Either take the cover off again to sew, or the way I did it, with some help maneuver the whole tee pee including poles around the sewing machine.

OPTIONAL – My sister later added/sewed on small loops for tent pegs at the base of each pole. By pegging the Tee Pee in place when outdoors, it prevents gusts of wind blowing it over. No need to use tent pegs indoors.

SET UP: The frame opens up just like an umbrella. Fill it with pillows and decorate with some bunting to personalize.

That’s it!! All done. I hope the directions were clear enough. It’s one of those projects that seem more logical as you are putting it together, so don’t let all the steps intimidate you.

Part 2 took my sister and I a leisurely afternoon with a 1yo under our feet. (It’s almost taken me longer to edit and write the blog post, lol)

Please feel free to leave any questions as a comment and I’ll try to respond as a reply as soon as practicable.
 
 
 
build a lemonade stand
 
 
2012familyyard1_rect540
 
2012familyyard1_rect540
 
 
 
 

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